The 20 Most Common Birds In New Hampshire

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Do you need assistance identifying birds that frequent your property in New Hampshire? Putting up bird feeders and seeing what comes to visit is a lot of fun, but it’s much more fun if you know who they are and can identify birds in your backyard. Now you may learn about the most popular birds that visit your feeders or hop across your yard in New Hampshire.

So, if you’re ready to go backyard birding in New Hampshire, keep reading to learn how to recognise birds and attract more birds to your yard.

These are the most typical backyard birds that may visit your lawn or feeders in New Hampshire. They’re the birds that show up the most on state checklists on the bird, and the data is a mix of backyard birds most usually seen in summer (June and July) and winter (December and January) (December and January). This data combination assures that you will most likely see these species no matter what time of year you go birding in New Hampshire.

The 20 Most Common Birds In New Hampshire

  1. American Robin
  2. Black-capped Chickadee
  3. American Goldfinch
  4. Song Sparrow
  5. Blue Jay
  6. American Crow
  7. Mourning Dove
  8. Common Yellowthroat
  9. Gray Catbird
  10. White-breasted Nuthatch
  11. Dark-eyed Junco
  12. Downy Woodpecker
  13. Tufted Titmouse
  14. Red-winged Blackbird
  15. Chipping Sparrow
  16. Cedar Waxwing
  17. Northern Cardinal
  18. Hairy Woodpecker
  19. Red-breasted Nuthatch
  20. Common Grackle

The 20 Most Common Birds In New Hampshire

1. American Robin

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American Robin
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusTurdus
SpeciesT. migratorius

American Robins are a common sight on lawns eating earthworms.  They have blackheads and back with red or orange breasts.  They tend to roost in trees in winter, so you are more likely to see them in your backyard from spring. They eat sunflower seeds, suet and peanut hearts, fruit, and mealworms. Platform feeders are best or food scattered on the ground

2. Black-capped Chickadee

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Black-capped Chickadee
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParidae
GenusPoecile
SpeciesP. atricapillus
Lengthfour to six inches
Weight11 g

The Black-capped Chickadee has a petite body and a large spherical head. These birds will gladly eat from backyard feeders and inspect everything, even you!

They have black beaks and capes, white cheeks, grey backs, wings, and tails. Suet, sunflower seeds, and peanuts or peanut butter are good ways to attract additional Black-capped Chickadees. They’ll even eat out of your hand.

3. American Goldfinch

american-goldfinch Colorado backyard birds
American-goldfinch
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderFringillidae
FamilyCarduelinae
GenusSpinus
SpeciesS. tristis

American Goldfinches are popular birds with the males bright yellow and black colouring in spring.  The females are duller brown, as are males in winter. Try planting thistles and milkweed to attract more American Goldfinches to your backyard.  They will visit most bird feeders and prefer sunflower seed and nyjer seed.

4. Song Sparrow

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KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GeniusMelospiza
Species
M. melodia

Singing sparrows aren’t as noticeable as other backyard birds, but these primarily brown-streaked birds utilise their almost continual song to attract mates in the spring and summer.

They are commonly perched on a low shrub singing in open, shrubby, and damp settings. They’re frequently seen at backyard feeders. Put black oil sunflower seeds, cracked corn, and nyjer on platform feeders to attract more song sparrows to your backyard feeders.

5. Blue Jay

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Blue Jay
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusCyanocitta
SpeciesC. cristata
Length22 – 30 cm
Weight65 – 110 g

Blue Jays have an erect blue crown, blue and black backs, and white undersides, making them common songbirds. They’re loud birds that fly in family groups and consume acorns when they come upon them. Peanuts, sunflower seeds, and suet are favourites, although they prefer to eat them from tray feeders or hopper feeders attached to a post. A birdbath will be appreciated as well.

6. American Crow

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American Crow
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusCorvus
SpeciesC. brachyrhynchos

Crows in the United States are substantial blackbirds that produce a harsh cawing sound. They are common birds found in various environments such as trees, woodlands, fields, beaches, and cities.

They consume a wide variety of foods and like to graze on the ground, where they eat earthworms, insects, seeds, and fruit. By throwing peanuts in your yard, you can attract additional American Crows.

7. Mourning Dove

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Morning Dove
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderColumbidae
ClassColumbiformes
GenusZenaida
Species
Z. macroura

Mourning Doves have an elegant appearance, a plump body, and long tails. The wings have light brown colour with black markings. Perching on telephone lines and foraging for seeds on the ground may be observed. By sprinkling millet on the floor or platform feeders, you may attract more Mourning Doves to your yard. They’ll consume black sunflower seeds, nyjer, cracked corn, and peanut hearts, among other things.

8. Common Yellowthroat

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Common Yellowthroat
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusGeothlypis
SpeciesG. trichas
Length4.3–5.1 in
Weight0.3–0.3 oz

Yellowthroats are little songbirds with long tails that are brownish on the back and bright yellow beneath. The guys wear a black mask that covers their entire faces. The intensity of the yellow varies by location, and certain areas beneath the surface may seem more olive.

They breed over most North America and may be found in marshy or wetland environments, brushy fields, and thick, tangled vegetation in the spring and summer. They consume insects primarily and can be found in vast, densely vegetated backyards.

9. Gray Catbird

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Gray Catbird
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyMimidae
GenusDumetella
C.T. Wood, 1837
SpeciesD. carolinensis
Length21 – 24 cm
Weight35 g

Gray Catbirds get their name from their characteristic catty mew sound, which may last up to ten minutes.

They’re medium-sized songbirds with slate-grey plumage, a black crown and tail, and a scarlet spot underneath their seats. Gray Catbirds may be found in thick shrubs, tiny trees, forest borders, and hedgerows. Fruit and fruit trees or shrubs like dogwood, winterberry, and serviceberry can attract more Gray Catbirds to your backyard feeders.

10. White-breasted Nuthatch

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White-breasted Nuthatch
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilySittidae
GenusSitta
SpeciesS. carolinensis
Length15 cm
Weight20 g

White-breasted Nuthatches are active little birds that are grey-blue on the back and white on the face and belly, with a black cap.

They jam large nuts and acorns into tree bark and then whack them with their bills to open or ‘hatch’ them to get the seed out. You can attract more White-breasted Nuthatches to your backyard with sunflower seeds and peanuts on tube feeders or suet feeders.

11. Dark-eyed Junco

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Dark-Eyed Junco
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GeniusJunco
Species
J. hyemalis

Dark-eyed Juncos are sparrows that come in various hues depending on where they are found. In the east, they are slate-coloured, whereas, in the west, they are black, white, and brown.

They are abundant over the continent and may be found in open and slightly forested regions, generally on the ground. Black oil sunflower seeds, nyjer, cracked corn, millet, and peanuts can all be used to attract additional Dark-eyed Juncos to backyard feeders. The ideal feeders are platform feeders or those dispersed on the ground.

12. Downy Woodpecker

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Downy Woodpecker
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusDryobates
SpeciesD. pubescens
Length14 –17 cm
Weight21 – 28 g

Downy Woodpeckers are tiny birds that use feeders in backyards. They’re frequently mistaken for other birds like chickadees. It is a Lutheran excellent way to attract more Downy Woodpeckers to your yard; still, they will also eat black oil sunflower seeds, millet, and peanuts from platform feeders.

13. Tufted Titmouse

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParidae
GenusBaeolophus
SpeciesB. bicolor
Length15 – 17 cm
Weight21 g

The Tufted Titmouse has a grey back and white underbelly, a lovely grey crest, and wide eyes and is frequently seen alongside chickadees, nuthatches, and woodpeckers.

They are seen in forests, parks, home feeders and maybe aggressive against smaller birds. Sunflower seeds, suet, and peanuts on tube feeders or suet cages can attract Tufted Titmice to your backyard feeders. They’ll eat from platform feeders as well.

14. Red-winged Blackbird

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Red-winged Blackbirds
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusAgelaius
SpeciesA. phoeniceus

With all-black colouration save for the vivid red and yellow shoulder patches, red-winged blackbirds are pretty frequent and easy to see. In contrast to the streaky brown pigmentation of the males, the females are rather drab.

They are frequently seen perched on telephone lines, and during the mating season, the males will fiercely protect their territory, even striking individuals who approach nests too close. They roost in the millions during the winter.

Spread mixed grain and seeds on the ground to attract more Red-winged blackbirds to your garden. Large tube feeders or platform feeders can also suffice.

15. Chipping Sparrow

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Chipping Sparrow
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GenusSpizella
SpeciesS. passerina
Length4.7–5.9 in
Weight0.4–0.6 oz

Chipping Sparrows are slender, long-tailed birds with a red cap and black eye line and a grey belly and brown and black-streaked back. The hues are more muted in the winter.

They breed over most of North America and Canada before flying to Mexico and Florida or the further south, where they spend the whole year. They may be seen in small groups on open terrain, and they will visit backyards in search of various types of birdseed.

16. Cedar Waxwing

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Cedar Waxwing
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderBombycillidae
FamilyPasseriformes
GenusBombycilla
Species
B. cedrorum

Cedar Waxwings are graceful sociable birds with a light brown head, breast, and crest that fades to grey on the back, wings, and tail. The tip of their tail is brilliant yellow, and their belly is pastel yellow. Their eyes are hidden under a tight black mask, and their wingtips are blazing red.

They spend the entire year in northern states and the winter in southern states. They may be found in berry bushes, forests, and near streams and have a high-pitched cry.

Plant natural trees and shrubs with tiny fruit, such as serviceberry, dogwood, juniper, winterberry, and hawthorn, to attract Cedar Waxwings to your yard. Fruit can also be used in platform feeders.

17. Northern Cardinal

Nothern_Cardinal_(Redbird)
Nothern_Cardinal_(Redbird
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCardinalidae
GenusCardinalis
SpeciesC. cardinalis
Length21 – 24 cm
Weight43 g

The brilliant red male Northern Cardinal with black around his face stands out against the white winter background. WiThe females are likewise a bit spectacular with their brown colouration, pointed brown crest, red accents, and red beaks.

During mating season, Northern Cardinals will occasionally attack their reflections in otorcely protect their territory. Sunflower seeds, peanut hearts, millet, and milo attract more Northern Cardinals to backyard feeders. Large tube feeders, hoppers, platform feeders, and food was thrown on the ground will all be used to feed them.

18. Hairy Woodpecker

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Hairy Woodpecker
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusLeuconotopicus
SpeciesL. villosus
Length9.8 in
Weight40–95 g

Hairy Woodpeckers have a red patch on the back of their heads and are black and white. They are somewhat larger than their Downy Woodpecker counterparts.

They’re common in woodlands, forests, and parks, as well as backyard feeders. Suet feeders, as well as peanut and black oil sunflower seeds on platform feeders, might attract more Hairy Woodpeckers to your yard.

19. Red-breasted Nuthatch

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Red-breasted Nuthatch
Kingdom
Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilySittidae
GenusSitta
SpeciesS. canadensis
Length12 cm
Weight10 g

Red-breasted Nuthatches spend the entire year in northeastern and western states, Alaska, and Canada, but if cone harvests are weak in the winter, they may migrate south throughout North America.

They have a reddish underbelly and a blue-grey body with black and white stripes on the head. Red-breasted Nuthatches can be seen scavenging for cones in coniferous woodlands, and they come to backyard feeders. Black oil sunflower seeds, suet feeders, peanuts, and mealworms can all help to attract additional Red-breasted Nuthatches to your yard.

20. Common Grackle

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Common Grackle

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusQuiscalus
SpeciesQ. quiscula
Length28 – 34 cm
Weight110 g

The Common Grackle is a blackbird with glossy iridescent bodies taller and longer-tailed than other blackbirds. They consume a variety of crops, but primarily maise, and congregate in loud groups high in the trees. Most mixed grain and seed strewn on the ground or platform feeders can attract more Common Grackles to your garden.

Birding Hotspots In New Hamsphire

Odiorne Point State Park

Odiorne Point State Park is the biggest unspoiled section of Atlantic Coast beachfront in New Hampshire, with 330 acres. It also has the largest number of species of any birding location in the state.
A rocky shore, beach, freshwater and saltwater marsh, and woodland are all part of the park. The location is ideal for migration, with birds following the shoreline and stopping to rest and feed before going on.

From waterbirds to shorebirds to migrating warblers, there are so many birding opportunities at Odiorne Point that it’s virtually hard to name them all. Scoters, Long-tailed Duck, Red-throated Loon, and Red-necked Grebe, as well as Great Cormorant, Purple Sandpiper (rocky areas), Razorbill, Black Guillemot, and Bonaparte’s Gull, flock to the shore in the winter. During migration, Virginia Rail, Sora, and Marsh Wren may be spotted in wetlands.

In the fall, Odiorne Point is a great spot to spot migratory raptors making their way south along the coast. Osprey, Northern Harrier, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper’s Hawk, Bald Eagle, Broad-winged Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, American Kestrel, Merlin, and Peregrine Falcon may all be seen from September through October.

Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge

The Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located on the edge of New Hampshire’s Great Bay, is a former airfield that now preserves over 1,000 acres. The highest winter concentration of Bald Eagles in New Hampshire may be found here, while the open water, marshes, and mudflats attract waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds.

There is no personnel on site, no tourist center, and only a kiosk at this sanctuary. It does, however, contain two year-round open paths that are suitable for general birdwatching. The Peverly Pond Trail is a half-mile walk that goes to a marsh on Great Bay; the Ferry Way Trail is two miles and runs through historic farms to a marsh. Wild Turkey, Osprey, Bald Eagle, Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Bluebird, and various nesting warblers such as Ovenbird, Black-and-white Warbler, and Pine Warbler are among the species observed here.

A number of places surrounding Great Bay provide excellent birding possibilities. The Great Bay Discovery Center near Sandy Point, on the south side of Great Bay, contains a 1,700-foot universally accessible boardwalk that leads through woods to a salt marsh. A vast variety of migrating and breeding songbirds may be seen here, as well as migrant waterfowl.
Adams Point Wildlife Management Area, on the west side of Great Bay, is a peninsula on the bay with hiking paths and an observation platform. Adams Point is a popular wintering spot for Bald Eagles, as well as a wonderful place to see a variety of waterbirds.

Hampton Beach State Park

Hampton Beach State Park is overly crowded in the summer due to its proximity to miles of beach and its popularity among recreational-vehicle owners. However, from the autumn until the spring, it’s a terrific area to explore—another of New Hampshire’s coastal locations from which to scan the Atlantic.
Common Eider, all three scoters, Long-tailed Duck, loons, grebes, Northern Gannet, Great Cormorant, Razorbill, Black Guillemot, and Black-legged Kittiwake are all common, with the rare rarity like King Eider or Thick-billed Murre thrown in for good measure. Purple Sandpipers spend their winters on rocky habitats.
Birds such as the Snowy Owl, Horned Lark, Lapland Longspur, Snow Bunting, and Common Redpoll might be attracted to open camping grounds and beaches that are crowded in the summer. Raptors are frequently observed traveling north in April and May.

Drive south on Highway 1A from the park and cross the Hampton Harbor Inlet bridge. To scan Hampton Harbor, park on the west side of the road south of the bridge. The number of waders and shorebirds in the region is depending on the tides, however the area can have a lot of them at times. You may also park here and go out to the short pier to survey the harbor.

Mount Washington

The 7.5-mile toll road to Mount Washington’s summit provides a simple, albeit pricy, route to the habitat of many sought-after high-elevation species. It climbs through conifer forest to the 6,288-foot treeless top, which is notorious (or infamous) for its harsh winter weather. It is open from early May to late October.

Look for Ruffed Grouse, Spruce Grouse, Black-backed Woodpecker, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Swainson’s Thrush, Hermit Thrush, Magnolia Warbler, Blackburnian Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Canada Warbler, Red Crossbill, and White-winged Crossbill at pullouts and trails along the road (scarce)
The Bicknell’s Thrush, which has a relatively limited distribution in northeastern North America, is the star of the Mount Washington performance. It exclusively nests on the highest peaks in the Northeast in this nation. Stopping to listen for its song on the auto road at the four-mile mark and beyond increases your chances of finding one. It’s critical to know the music.

In June, the toll road’s operator began giving special trips to spot Bicknell’s Thrush, which leave early in the morning before the route opens to regular traffic.

Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge

Pondicherry was designated as New Hampshire’s first Important Bird Area and a National Natural Landmark in 2004. Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge presently owns the 6,405-acre parcel.
It’s accessible via a trailhead on Airport Road southeast of Whitfield, and has ponds, boreal spruce-fir forest, riparian woodland, and wetlands. A level trail that links to other walking routes and goes to observation platforms on Cherry Pond and Little Cherry Pond, as well as an ancient railroad line. Hunting is permitted here, so verify the seasons ahead of time.
At Pondicherry, the “laughing” cry of the Common Loon is a classic north woods sound. Mourning, Blackburnian, Palm, and Canada warblers are among the more than 15 species of warblers that nest here. Wood Duck, Ring-necked Duck, Ruffed Grouse, American Bittern, Broad-winged Hawk, American Woodcock, Black-billed Cuckoo, Black-backed Woodpecker, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Alder Flycatcher, Willow Flycatcher, Least Flycatcher, Blue-headed Vireo, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Veery, and Hermit Thrush are just a few of the other breeding birds found here.

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