Top 20 Most Common Backyard Birds In Wyoming

Top 20 Most Common Backyard Birds In Wyoming

Wyoming’s state bird is the Western Meadowlark. This bird was picked in 1927 and can be seen in broad meadows and fields in the summer, where it helps to reduce insects.

According to ebird, Wyoming is home to 438 different bird species. White Pelicans, Sandhill Cranes, Osprey, Harlequin Ducks, Bald Eagle, Greater Sage-Grouse, Mountain Bluebird, Trumpeter Swan, Northern Harriers, Avocet, Golden Eagle, Wild Turkeys, Western Tanagers, White-faced Ibis, and Wilson’s Phalarope are just a few of Wyoming’s most notable birds.

The Bald Eagle is Wyoming’s most giant bird, with females having a wingspan of up to 8 feet (2.5 m). A formidable bird of prey, the white-headed national bird emblem of the United States is a powerful white-headed national bird symbol of the United States. A California Condor has been observed as far south as Wyoming, but it is not shared.

The American Robin is the most common bird in Wyoming, appearing in 37 percent of all bird checklists during the year.

If you want to get out and see birds in their natural habitat, Wyoming has six national parks, eight national forests, seven national wildlife refuges, and 12 state parks.

Top 20 Most Common Backyard Birds In Wyoming

  1. American Robin
  2. Red-winged Blackbird
  3. Northern Flicker
  4. Western Meadowlark
  5. Mourning Dove
  6. Eurasian Collared-Dove
  7. House Sparrow
  8. Brown-headed Cowbird
  9. Chipping Sparrow
  10. Pine Siskin
  11. Mountain Bluebird
  12. Common Grackle
  13. Yellow-rumped Warbler
  14. Mountain Chickadee
  15. Black-billed Magpie
  16. Red-breasted Nuthatch
  17. House Wren
  18. Barn Swallow
  19. Brewer’s Blackbird
  20. Dark-eyed Junco

Top 20 Most Common Backyard Birds In Wyoming

1. American Robin

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American Robin
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusTurdus
SpeciesT. migratorius

American Robins, which consume earthworms, are a common sight on lawns. Their heads and backs are black, while their breasts are crimson or orange. Because they prefer to roost in trees during the winter, you’re more likely to see them in your backyard starting in the spring.

American Robins can be found in various environments, including woodlands, forests, and mountains, as well as fields, parks, and lawns. Earthworms, insects, snails, and fruit are among their favorite foods.

Sunflower seeds, suet and peanut hearts, fruit, and mealworms can all be used to attract more American Robins to your yard. Platform feeders or food distributed on the ground are ideal—plant juniper, sumac, hawthorn, dogwood, and other natural plants that yield berries.

2. Red-winged Blackbird

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Red-winged Blackbirds
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusAgelaius
SpeciesA. phoeniceus

The all-black plumage of red-winged blackbirds, save for the vivid red and yellow shoulder patches, makes them simple to distinguish. In comparison to the streaky brown pigmentation of the males, the females are pretty drab.

They are frequently seen sitting on telephone wires, and during the breeding season, the males will fiercely protect their territory, even attacking individuals who come too close to nests. They roost in huge flocks during the winter, numbering in the millions.

Spread mixed grain and seeds on the ground to attract more Red-winged blackbirds to your yard. They’ll eat enormous tube feeders or platform feeders as well.

3. Northern Flicker

Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusColaptes
SpeciesC. auratus

Northern Flickers are large woodpeckers with brownish coloring, black spots, bars, and crescents, and red on the neck, about the size of a robin or a crow. Eastern birds’ tails and wing feathers are bright yellows, while western birds’ are red.

They can be spotted in woods and forest margins on the ground, hunting for ants and beetles. Those that breed in Canada or Alaska move to the southern states, but they can be found throughout the lower 48 states all year.

Suet and black oil sunflower seeds will attract more Northern Flickers to your garden feeders.

4. Western Meadowlark

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Western Meadowlark
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusSturnella
SpeciesS. neglecta
Length6.3–10.2 in
Weight3.1–4.1 oz

With their bright yellow bellies and melodious song, Western Meadowlarks can brighten up your day.  This is probably what makes them so popular, so popular in fact that they are the state bird of 6 states.

Western Meadowlarks are related to blackbirds and are about the size of a Robin with shades of brown and white upperparts and a black V-shaped band across the bright yellow chest that turns gray in winter.

They breed in northern US states and Canada before moving to more southern states.  Those in the west and midwest remain all year. Western Meadowlarks can be found foraging insects and seeds from weeds and seeds alone on the ground or in small flocks in grasslands, meadows, and fields.

Try hulled sunflower seeds and cracked corn on ground feeders to attract more Western Meadowlarks to your yard.

5. Mourning Dove

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Morning Dove
Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderColumbidae
ClassColumbiformes
GenusZenaida
Species
Z. macroura

Mourning Doves are small, graceful birds with plump bodies and long tails. The wings have light brown color with black markings.

In grasslands, pastures, and backyards, they can be observed perching on telephone wires and forage for seeds on the ground. Mourning Doves can be found in open regions or along woodland edges. Mourning Doves are located across the lower 48 states throughout the year, but they may migrate after reproducing in the far north.

By sprinkling millet on the ground or platform feeders, you can attract more Mourning Doves to your yard. In addition to black sunflower seeds, nyjer, cracked corn, and peanut hearts, they will consume black sunflower seeds, nyjer, cracked corn, and peanut hearts.

6. Eurasian Collared-Dove

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderColumbiformes
FamilyColumbidae
GenusStreptopelia
SpeciesS. decaocto
Length47–55 cm
Weight125–240 g

Eurasian Collared-Doves are an invasive species that first arrived in the United States in the 1980s and has since spread across the country. They’re light brownish-gray with white patches on the tail and a black half collar at the nape of the neck, similar to Mourning Doves. They’re also more extensive and have a square seat instead of a pointed one.

They avoid dense forests prefer habitats near people where seeds are plentiful, like backyard feeders and farms. Eurasian Collared’Doves eat a range of sources and grains, but they also eat berries and insects.

Millet, oats, cracked corn, and Black oil sunflower seeds or hulled sunflower seeds on ground feeders can attract more Eurasian-Collared-Doves to your yard, but they may also visit platform or hopper feeders.

7. House Sparrow

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House Sparrow
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasseridae
GenusPasser
SpeciesP. domesticus
Length14 – 18 cm
Weight24 – 40 g

Another introduced species that has thrived and is now one of the most frequent birds is the House Sparrow. They are commonly seen around houses and buildings and can be pretty friendly, eating from your hand.

House Sparrows can be found in most crowded settings, particularly in cities, towns, farms, and other places where humans congregate. Grain and seed, as well as wasted food, are their primary sources of nutrition. They are pests since they are non-native, yet they will still be found in backyards if you do not feed them.

Most types of birdseed, including millet, corn, and sunflower seeds, will attract more House Sparrows to your backyard feeders.

8. Brown-headed Cowbird

Brown-headed_cowbird_birdsflock.com-common-Backyard-Birds-In-Ontari
Brown-headed_cowbird_birdsflock.com-common-Backyard-Birds-In-Ontario
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusMolothrus
SpeciesM. ater
Length16–22 cm
Weight30–60 g

Brown-headed Cowbird males have short tails and thick heads and have a black body and brown head. Females are brown with faint striping all over.

They are frequently seen as a nuisance since they eat the eggs of smaller songbirds to put their eggs in the nest and have the bird raise their young. They breed in much of northern and western North America before moving south, although they spend the entire year in the Eastern and Southern states and the Pacific Coast.

9. Chipping Sparrow

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Chipping Sparrow
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GenusSpizella
SpeciesS. passerina
Length4.7–5.9 in
Weight0.4–0.6 oz

Chipping Sparrows are slender, long-tailed birds with a rusty cap and black eye line and a grayish belly and brown and black-streaked back. The colors are more subdued in the winter.

They breed across much of North America and Canada before traveling south to Mexico and Florida, spending the entire year. They congregate in small flocks on open terrain and visit backyards searching for various types of birdseed.

10. Pine Siskin

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Pine Siskin
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFringillidae
GenusSpinus
SpeciesS. pinus
Length11–14 cm
Weight12–18 g

Pine Siskins are tiny finches with brown wing and tail streaks and yellow wing and tail streaks. Their tail is forked, and their wings are pointed, with a short pointed bill.

Pine Siskins breed in Canada and can spend the winter in the United States, but their migration is dependent on pine cone yields, so they may not move in some years. Some birds, however, spend the entire year in the western pine forests.

As their name suggests, Pine Siskins eat seeds from conifers, but they also eat immature buds and seeds from grasses and weeds.

Backyards can attract Pine Siskins using thistle and nyjer feeders, as well as black oil sunflower seeds and suet.

11. Mountain Bluebird

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Mountain Bluebirds are the bluest of all the bluebirds, with males having a vivid low back, softer blue underbelly, and white under the tails. Females have gray-brown tails and wings with some blue streaks.

Mountain Bluebirds breed in open regions with short grass, shrubs, and trees around grasslands, tundra, and meadows in the northwest United States, Canada, and Alaska, at elevations of up to 12,000 feet above sea level. They spend the winter in open habitats like meadows, prairies, and grasslands across the southwestern states and Mexico. Some birds may spend the entire year in the center of their range. Perched on fences or powerlines, they are frequently observed.

Mountain Bluebirds eat a lot of insects, notably beetles, grasshoppers, and caterpillars. They eat grapes, juniper, currants, elderberries, sumac, mistletoe, hackberry seeds, and small fruits in the winter.

Install nest boxes to attract more Mountain Bluebirds to your yard. They may also go to platform feeders searching for mealworms, suet, or fruit. You might also try growing some fruits that they like in the winter.

12. Common Grackle

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Common Grackle
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusQuiscalus
SpeciesQ. quiscula
Length28 – 34 cm
Weight110 g

The Common Grackle is a blackbird with a glossy iridescent body that is higher and longer-tailed than a standard blackbird. They eat a variety of crops, but primarily maize, and congregate in noisy groups increased in the trees. They will also devour trash, making them a nuisance.

Open forests, marshes, parks, and fields are their many habitats. In they may congregate in the millions to forage and roost alongside other blackbird species in the winter, common Grackle spends the entire year in much of the east and southeast but migrates south after mating in the far north and west of its range.

Most mixed grain and seed spread on ground feeders or platform feeders can attract more Common Grackles to your backyard.

13. Yellow-rumped Warbler

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Yellow-rumped Warbler
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. coronata
Length14 cm
Weight12.5 g

Yellow-rumped Warblers have a gray body with yellow flashes on the face, flanks, and rump, as well as white wings. Females are slightly browner than males, and winter birds are paler brown with bright yellow tails and sides, which turn bright yellow and gray in spring.

After reproducing primarily in Canada, they migrate in vast numbers south through most southern and central North America, the Pacific Coast, and Mexico and Central America.

Sunflower seeds, suet, raisins, and peanut butter can all be used to attract Yellow-rumped Warblers to your yard.

14. Mountain Chickadee

Top 20 Most Common <a href=
Backyard Birds In Wyoming” width=”640″ height=”427″ /> Top 20 Most Common Backyard Birds In Wyoming

Mountain Chickadees have black and whiteheads and gray bodies, with darker gray on the back and lighter gray underside.

They live in the western mountains and frequently observe evergreen forests, particularly conifers. Mountain Chickadees dine on insects, spiders, nuts, seeds, and frequent garden feeders. Mountain Chickadeesofteny saves food for later use and constructs a food store.

Try setting up nest boxes to attract additional Mountain Chickadees to your yard, and they’ll come to most sorts of feeders with black oil sunflower seeds, mealworms, nyjer, suet, and peanut butter.

15. Black-billed Magpie

Kingdom:Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusPica
SpeciesP. hudsonia
Length45 – 60 cm
Weight180 g

Black-billed Magpies are noisy black and white birds with long tails with blue-green iridescent flashes in the wing and tail. They are larger than Jays.

They do not migrate and feed on fruit and grain, beetles, and grasshoppers in meadows, grasslands, and other open areas. They kill small mammals like squirrels and voles and raid bird nests for eggs, nestlings, and even carrion.

Black-billed Magpies will frequent backyards searching for black oil sunflower seeds, peanuts, fruit, suet, millet, and milo in platform and suet feeders.

16. Red-breasted Nuthatch

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Red-breasted Nuthatch
Kingdom
Animalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilySittidae
GenusSitta
SpeciesS. canadensis
Length12 cm
Weight10 g

Red-breasted Nuthatches spend the entire year in northeastern and western states, Alaska, and Canada, but if cone crops are poor in the winter, they may migrate south across North America.

They have a reddish underbelly and a blue-gray body with black and white stripes on the head. Red-breasted Nuthatches can be found scavenging for cones in coniferous woodlands, and they come to backyard feeders. Black oil sunflower seeds, suet feeders, peanuts, and mealworms can all help to attract additional Red-breasted Nuthatches to your yard.

17. House Wren

House Wren
House Wren
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTroglodytidae
GenusTroglodytes
SpeciesT. aedon
Length11 to 13 cm
Weight10 to 12 g

House Wrens are little brown birds with a lighter throat and darker banded wings and tails. Before moving to the extreme south and Mexico for the winter, they breed in most states.

House Wrens forage for insects and spiders such as beetles, caterpillars, and earwigs among brush heaps in backyards, parks, and open woodlands. They’re frequently seen hopping through tangles and low branches with their tails raised, pausing to sing their happy song.

For their small, House Wrens are fearsome. They may often attack larger birds to gain the best nest holes, dragging eggs or nestlings out of a nest site they want.

By leaving brush piles or erecting a nest box in your backyard, you might attract more House Wrens.

18. Barn Swallow

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Barn Swallow
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyHirundinidae
GenusHirundo
SpeciesH. rustica
Length17–19 cm
Weight16–22 g

Barn Swallows are tiny birds with a dark blue back, wings, and tail, as well as a reddish-brown underbelly and across the face. Long outer feathers form a deep fork in the bottom.

They breed across most of North America before migrating to Central and South America to breed. Barn Swallows can be found soaring over meadows, farms, and fields searching for insects, and they commonly build mud nests on artificial structures such as barns.

Put up nest boxes or cups to attract more Barn Swallows, and they may eat ground-up eggshells on a platform feeder.

19. Brewer’s Blackbird

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Brewer’s Blackbirds are medium-sized blackbirds with a glossy black coat in the males and plain brown in the females, with purple on the head and greenish iridescent on the body.

They breed in the central United States before moving to the southern United States and Mexico, although they remain in the western United States.

Brewer’s blackbirds can be found in a broad range of environments, including grasslands, marshes, meadows, forests, and beaches, as well as close to humans in parks, fields, and backyards. They eat mostly seeds and grains, but they also eat insects and whatever else they may find.

Brewer’s blackbirds visit backyards to Mahon-ground lower seeds, cracked maize, and millet on-ground feeders.

20. Dark-eyed Junco

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Dark Eye Junco
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GeniusJunco
Species
J. hyemalis

Dark-eyed Juncos are sparrows that come in various hues depending on where they are found. In the east, they are slate-colored, whereas, in the west, they are black, white, and brown.

They are abundant over the continent and can be found in open and slightly wooded areas, generally on the ground. Some people live there in the west and the Appalachian Mountains all year. Those who breed in Canada and Alaska move south to the United States in the winter.

Black oil sunflower seeds, nyjer, cracked corn, millet, and peanuts can all be used to attract additional Dark-eyed Juncos to backyard feeders. The ideal feeders are platform feeders or those dispersed on the ground.

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